Manufacturing and Supply

Manufacturing and Supply

Dough handling club
Campden BRI project 120101 (April 2010 - October 2014)
Club Funded

Dough stickiness is a major problem in large mechanised bakeries as sticky dough cannot be processed, leading to process disruption and product loss. There is no universal measure for stickiness within the food industry and stickiness is usually determined subjectively based on the results of manually handling the dough. The aim of this project is to develop a test to quantitatively measure stickiness and to then investigate the causes of stickiness in bread dough.

Contact: Dr. Charles Speirs
+44(0)1386 842284
e-mail: charles.speirs@campdenbri.co.uk


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Surface pasteurisation of food packages - understanding the issues, reducing waste and saving energy and water.
Campden BRI project 123480 (April 2011 - March 2014)
Defra LINK Funded

Pasteurisation requirements for acid or acidified food products are clearly defined in many guidelines and can be delivered 'in-pack' or to products that are heat processed before being clean/aseptically filled. Many are hot filled as ready-to-eat (RTE) products and it has always been assumed that the hot fill process will give the packaging and closures a sufficient thermal process to reduce any microbial hazards present. However, no guidance exists and the uncertainty has meant that foods are either processed to a higher temperature than necessary before filling, or the product is given a further heat treatment after filling. Quantifying the heat treatment given to food packages during hot-fill operations would potentially increase line efficiency and reduce waste, reduce energy input, reduce water usage and reduce the environmental burdens of food manufacturing.

There are key scientific challenges for this project, including understanding the heat transfer and fluid flow issues and development of methods to evaluate process adequacy and effectiveness at the food-package interface. Commercially, the project applies to several package formats: glass (e.g. jars and bottles), plastic (e.g. pots, bags, pouches, cartons and trays), card (e.g. soups and sauces) and metallised film (e.g. pouches and bags).

Contact: Martin George
+44(0)1386 842037
e-mail: martin.george@campdenbri.co.uk


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Minimising food and energy waste through "super-chill" storage
Campden BRI project 124916 (October 2011 - September 2014)
Defra LINK Funded

This project aims to reduce the carbon footprint of food manufacturers by introducing a novel method of storage ("superchill") to minimise waste and energy use in the cold storage of foods and using microbiological screening to predict microbial spoilage patterns and thus minimise waste. The project will to develop a practical method of superchilling food that has the widest possible application to the food industry. This method will be developed to deliver optimum product quality whilst retaining product safety and increasing longevity. The longevity of the product will be limited by the growth of psychrotrophic microorganisms, and so both the standard and psychrotrophic spoilage microflora will be monitored to aid the assignation of an appropriate shelf life. The project will also quantify the potential savings in energy and waste that can be achieved through using superchilling.

Contact: Dr. Greg Jones
+44(0)1386 842143
e-mail: greg.jones@campdenbri.co.uk


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Improving process control for reducing energy use in food production
Campden BRI project 125499 (January 2012 - December 2014)
Member Subscription Funded

Environmental sustainability has become key for many food manufacturers. The need for energy efficiency is driven by both commercial and regulatory considerations. To remain competitive in the face of rising energy costs, the food industry needs to use energy more efficiently throughout its operations. A paucity of numerical data makes it difficult for organisations to assess the significance of particular operations and practices within their production environment and prioritise them accordingly. There is also a lack of easily accessible support systems, tools and methods to help organisations understand and manage their impacts. This project will develop an easily applicable tool-kit of diagnostic instrumentation to monitor equipment performance, as well as a method for energy optimisation.

Contact: Martin George
+44(0)1386 842037
e-mail: martin.george@campdenbri.co.uk


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Sustainable cleaning and disinfection in fresh-cut food industries (SUSCLEAN)
Campden BRI project 125687 (January 2012 - December 2014)
EU Funded

SUSCLEAN aims to contribute to the development and implementation of a new generation of environment-friendly equipment sanitation and food product decontamination technologies, ensuring food safety focused on minimally processed vegetables. It will design new decontamination approaches for minimally processed vegetables and sanitation strategies for their processing equipment along the supply chain; propose guidance and recommendations to renew the best available processing techniques; consider the impact of sanitation and decontamination strategies in line with the Directive on Integrated Pollution Prevention Control; and improve the hygienic design of equipment for the fresh-cut product industry.

Contact: Dr. John Holah
+44(0)1386 842041
e-mail: john.holah@campdenbri.co.uk


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Economically and ecologically efficient water management in the European chemical industry (E4water)
Campden BRI project 126825 (January 2012 - December 2014)
EU Funded

Water is used in industries for multiple purposes: cleaning, heating/cooling, steam, transport, as raw material, as solvent, as part of product, etc. Industry accounts for about 5 to 20% of the worldwide freshwater withdrawals, mostly from surface water (87%) and from groundwater (13%). In Europe the chemical and petroleum refinement industries are responsible for approximately half of all water use by manufacturing industry; that represents 11% of the total freshwater abstracted. The demand for eco-efficient water and wastewater treatment solutions in the European chemical industry is inextricably linked to the future growth pattern of the chemical industry itself. Campden BRI's role in this project is to look at water efficiency technologies in the food and drink industries.

Contact: Anke Fendler
+44(0)1386 842079
e-mail: anke.fendler@campdenbri.co.uk


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Conceptual design of a food manufacturing research infrastructure to boost up innovation in the food industry (FoodManufuture)
Campden BRI project 125690 (January 2012 - December 2014)
EU Funded

The project is performing a conceptual design study in order to provide the basis for decision making for a European food manufacturing research infrastructure that will boost the competitiveness of the European food manufacturing sector. Four extreme alternative future visions for the European food industry have been described, and the needs for these alternatives are being assessed. These needs are being compared against current solutions to see what extreme solutions would be required, so that an appropriate infrastructure can be formulated. The final report will present the most promising models for the new research infrastructure, technical and economic figures, and optional funding sources.

Contact: Dr. John Holah
+44(0)1386 842041
e-mail: john.holah@campdenbri.co.uk


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A European network for mitigating bacterial colonisation and persistence on foods and food processing environments
Campden BRI project 128756 (September 2012 - September 2015)
EU Funded

Persistent bacteria on foods and processing sites are of great concern in the food industry, potentially causing continuous recontamination and safety problems. Removal of persistent bacteria and biofilms requires costly efforts leading to lost productivity and environmental issues. There is a need to combine and re-evaluate current scientific knowledge on the persistence of bacteria and to introduce new engineering approaches for controlling pathogens. The objective of this Action is to enable the development/promotion of targeted solutions for controlling risks associated with persistent bacteria and biofilms in the food industry. It involves a multidisciplinary network which will expand our knowledge on colonization and persistence, and validate/identify appropriate methods for monitoring colonisation patterns. Known and emerging intervention methods will be explored and re-evaluated. The knowledge obtained will be promoted to the relevant food industries and the scientific community.

Contact: Dr. John Holah
+44(0)1386 842041
e-mail: john.holah@campdenbri.co.uk


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New technologies for food manufacturing
Campden BRI project 128877 (January 2013 - December 2015)
Member subscription funded

The industrial need for timely, accurate and concise information on developments in manufacturing technologies is as great as ever. The 'New Technologies' project has been running in various forms since 1990. The current project consists of a blend of desk-based research to produce information bulletins, and practical 'proof of principle' evaluations of new technologies carried out with a view to identifying areas for more detailed research. This approach will continue. The New Technologies Bulletin and Technology Updates provide a 'snapshot' of current innovations in food manufacture. The method of delivery of bulletin content will develop further and will take advantage of advancing web technology. The project will deliver 6 New Technologies Bulletins, 12 New Technologies Updates and reports on 3 feasibility studies.

Contact: Dr. Craig Leadley
+44(0)1386 842059
e-mail: craig.leadley@campdenbri.co.uk


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New approaches to heat process validation: process design and process surrogates
Campden BRI project 128878 (January 2013 - December 2015)
Member subscription funded

One of the most important areas in the industrial application of new heat processes is the validation to prove that the method delivers a stable and safe product when used in the production environment. Thermal processing is a core technique for assuring product safety and methods for assessing thermal process safety need to be continuously developed as the food and drink industries move on. This project will address the development and application of new and improved process validation methods. Validation procedures can utilise both physical measurement of time/temperature and the measurement of the death of relevant organisms to give the food processor the data required to have confidence in the system being used.

Contact: Joy Gaze
+44(0)1386 842064
e-mail: joy.gaze@campdenbri.co.uk


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MUlti SEnsor Technology for management of food processes (MUSE-Tech)
Campden BRI project 131353 (October 2013 - September 2016)
EU funded

The concept behind MUSE-Tech is the development of three single sensors (Photoacoustic, Quasi Imaging UV-Vis and a Distributed Temperature) which will be integrated in a versatile and affordable Multi Sensor Device (MSD). The MSD will be based on a versatile plug-in architecture for real-time monitoring (on-/in-line) of multiple parameters associated with the quality and the chemical safety of raw and in-process materials. MSD data array, including quantitative information about both volatile and non-volatile compounds, will be merged by using data fusion techniques and will be used to build empirical predictive models for Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) and to establish the multivariate design space. Auto-adaptive software will be implemented to automatically adjust Critical Process Parameters (CPPs) on the basis of the real-time measurement of CQAs in the raw and in-process materials. MUSE-tech will contribute to reduce manufacturing costs and food waste by enabling a more efficient control of the processes and supporting the competitiveness of the EU food industry, especially SMEs.

Contact: Dr. Martin Whitworth
+44(0)1386 842139
e-mail: martin.whitworth@campdenbri.co.uk


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Improving the effectiveness of washing and cleaning using small, micro- or nano-scale air bubbles
Campden BRI project 131994 (January 2014 - December 2016)
Member subscription funded

Many foods and food contact surfaces are washed or cleaned by either spray or deluge of water. The costs of water and its treatment are increasing so methods to reduce water usage are required by industry. Further research in Japan, using nano-scale bubbles in water, has also shown potential for practical improvements in cleaning.

There is great potential for the use of this technology. Microbial contamination or soiling that is firmly attached to a surface will require some chemical treatment following by spraying. The addition of abrasion by adding particles to the water is not practical due to the need for additional waste water treatment and particle recovery. Modifying the properties of the water by introducing air into the liquid provides the additional cleaning forces. Tension at the surface of each bubble resists forces applied to the bubble and it is this action that leads to an additional cleaning effect of the water/air mixture. Currently, there is no published information or guidance on the best bubble size. The applications of the technology are many and include cleaning of production equipment and washing of many foods.

Contact: Dr. Dean Burfoot
+44(0)1386 842052
e-mail: dean.burfoot@campdenbri.co.uk


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On-line technologies for food process control
Campden BRI project 131995 (January 2014 - December 2016)
Member subscription funded

There is an ever-increasing need to transfer measurement and sensing technology from the laboratory / research arena into food manufacturing facilities (at- or on-line). A major driver is the need for rapid, sensitive measurements to enable quick reaction to changes in product quality or process conditions. This need is best met by detection and sensing solutions which can be integrated for automated control of manufacturing processes, which can also provide quality assurance data and remote monitoring of product quality and process performance. Current applications for on-line measurements of food processes include monitoring of equipment parameters such as speed, power consumption and temperature. Monitoring of product properties includes temperature monitoring of thermal processing, NIR measurement of composition, and foreign body detection. Opportunities exist to provide additional information on food processes through novel application of new and established sensing approaches. Potential benefits of on-line sensing for improved food quality, safety and reduced waste can be quantified in hundreds of millions of pounds.

Contact: Dr. Martin Whitworth
+44(0)1386 842139
e-mail: martin.whitworth@campdenbri.co.uk


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Quality validation for heat processed foods: improving product quality, reducing process energy and cost
Campden BRI project 134926 (January 2015 - December 2017)
Member subscription funded

Better preservation of the nutritional and sensory properties of foods during heat processing are very important for quality and consumer acceptance of the products. It can also have beneficial effects for food product development. For example, antioxidants are often added to fat-containing foods to delay or slow down the development of rancidity. Greater retention of naturally present or added antioxidants through optimal thermal processing can improve product shelf life. Optimised thermal process could also reduce cost and energy consumption. CTemp modelling has been proven to be an effective means of thermal safety validation. TTIs are also very successful in validation of thermal process safety and are now widely used in thermal process validation where conventional temperature probes cannot be used. A micro-litre quantity of food grade enzyme encapsulated in a TTI and having similar thermal kinetics as target microorganisms can be used to safely measure the degree of heat treatment given to the food product. Both CTemp and TTI techniques can be developed as quality sensors that can be used to optimise the thermal processes. This project will provide a systematic study of process validation and optimisation to reduce cost and energy consumption, improve product quality and ensure safety.

Contact: James Luo
+44(0)1386 842098
e-mail: james.luo@campdenbri.co.uk


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